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Articles

CT’s two-tiered human services system: ‘One tier too many’
Oak Hill, Inc., the largest nonprofit provider of human services for the state, recently trained two group home workers, only to see them jump to the competition earlier this year. The competition is the state. Connecticut has an unusual two-tiered system of residential programs for persons with developmental disabilities. The state runs some group homes and other residential facilities, and contracts with nonprofits such as Oak Hill to run others. The work is the same; the...
Change is coming for nonprofit human service providers, but will it make or break them?
It is a time of reckoning for Connecticut’s private, nonprofit social services. After two decades of flat or reduced funding from its chief client — state government — community-based agencies are struggling to retain both their programs and the low-paid staff who deliver care for thousands of poor, disabled and mentally-ill adults and children. Depending on the vantage point, Connecticut’s nonprofit social services sector is viewed as either the best means to preserve the state’s...
After years of cuts, nonprofits struggle to survive.
The term “nonprofit organization” may well be misleading. Some might think nonprofits aren’t really businesses. Ah, but they are; indeed, some are large, intricate and highly regulated businesses. Like for-profit businesses, they need revenue to execute their missions. When that revenue falls off, they must make creative and/or hard-nosed business decisions.
Study of tolls remains CT’s political hot potato
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s plan to commission a $10 million analysis on restoring tolls to Connecticut’s highways continues to provide fodder for this year’s state elections. Sen. Joe Markley of Southington, one of three Republicans battling for the nomination for lieutenant governor, announced Tuesday he is seeking a court injunction to stop the study of an electronic tolling system.
Boughton, Stefanowski, have lots of confidence, few details on plans to phase out income tax
Republican gubernatorial contenders Mark Boughton and Bob Stefanowski have no problem putting an expiration date on the state income tax. Boughton has it going away in 10 years, Stefanowski in eight. But how exactly would they eliminate a tax that funds half the state budget? There are no clear answers to that question.
Senate Approves Crumbling Foundation Survey
A $154.2 billion spending bill for the departments of Agriculture, Transportation, Interior and Housing and Urban Development that cleared the Senate this week included provisions sought by Sens. Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy to assess the damage done by concrete containing pyrrhotite, and to offer suggestions on ways to mitigate homeowners’ financial losses.
CT lawmakers seek federal help for homeowners with crumbling foundations
As Congress rushes to finish work before its August recess, Connecticut lawmakers are trying to get some federal help for homeowners who have been victimized by tainted concrete that has caused the foundations of their homes to crumble.
Panel seeks new ways to slow skyrocketing state pension costs
A new panel is exploring how Connecticut can use state assets — both physical properties and revenue streams — to mitigate pension costs expected to surge dramatically over the next 15 years.
Bond Commission approves $10M for tolling study
The State Bond Commission late Wednesday morning approved a $10 million allocation to finance a study of electronic tolling in Connecticut.
Panel seeks new ways to slow skyrocketing state pension costs
A new panel is exploring how Connecticut can use state assets — both physical properties and revenue streams — to mitigate pension costs expected to surge dramatically over the next 15 years.

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