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9
Connecticut CPA
g
July/August 2016
How did you decide to pursue a
career as a CPA?
In high school a teacher said I should
consider being a CPA.
Where did you receive your
accounting education?
I did not go to college after high school.
We could not afford it. Instead, I took
correspondence courses with LaSalle
Extension University.
At that time, one could take the CPA
Exam based on experience. In order
to get that experience, I worked for a
CPA. My salary was $5 a week.
At that time, the CPA Exam consisted
of three parts. I took the exam just pri-
or to the attack on Pearl Harbor and
passed two of the three parts. I enlist-
ed the day after the attack and served
in the Army for 51 months. When I was
discharged from the service, I took
the CPA Exam again. It was now a
four-part exam. Since I had credit for
the two parts, I took the two parts I
was missing and passed them. I was
now a CPA.
Where did you work during your
career? What was it like?
I wanted my own practice. A brother-in-
law was a CPA with a well-established
practice. He gave me a client. Three
brothers-in-law had two businesses
between them and they became
clients. I also purchased a few clients
from another accountant. I now had
the start of a practice.
In the early years, I had a partner. Our
office was in Hamden. I was doing okay
with our practice and reached the point
that I did not want to look for additional
clients. As a result, we separated and
I set up an office in my home. My wife
did not work. She did volunteer work
for Yale New Haven Hospital. At the
age of 58 I sold my practice and retired
to Florida for warm weather and golf.
We lived in Florida for 37 years. We
are now in a retirement community in
Georgia near our daughter.
How has the world changed since
you were a child?
When I was a child the world was not
as violent as it is now. I did not feel
threatened when I walked the streets.
The papers and news on TV are full of
all kinds of violence.
What advice would you give to
someone just starting out his or her
career as a CPA?
Plan your future. Live well and provide
for the future. My motto always was:
Pay yourself first for the future and live
off the rest.
MEET a
MEMBER
Paul Sahl,
CPA
"I took the exam just prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor and passed two of
the three parts. I enlisted the day after the attack and served in the Army
for 51 months. When I was discharged from the service, I took the CPA
Exam again."
When Lifetime Member Paul Sahl responded to
our annual membership renewal, he mentioned
that he had just turned 100 years young. We
couldn't resist the opportunity to check in with
him and learn a little bit more about his life and
career as a Connecticut CPA.
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